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Sex During Period

 

TIPS, BENEFITS, AND SIDE EFFECTS

• Can you have sex during your period?

During your reproductive years, you’ll get a menstrual period about once a month. Unless you’re especially squeamish, there’s no need to avoid sexual activity during your period. Though period sex can be a bit messy, it is safe. And, having sex when you’re menstruating can actually offer a few advantages, including relief from menstrual cramps.

 

Read on to learn more about sex during your period.

 

What Are The Benefits?

Having sex during your period has a few upsides:

 

1. Relief From Cramps

Orgasms may relieve menstrual cramps. Menstrual cramps are a result of your uterus contracting to release its lining. When you have an orgasm, the muscles of your uterus also contract. Then they release. That release should bring some relief from period cramps.

Sex also triggers the release of chemicals called endorphins, which make you feel good. Plus, engaging in sexual activity occupies your mind, which may help take it off your menstrual discomfort.

 

2. Shorter Period

Having sex may make your periods shorter. Muscle contractions during an orgasm push out the uterine contents faster. That could result in shorter periods.

 

3. Increased Sex Drive

Your libido changes throughout your menstrual cycle, thanks to hormonal fluctuations. While many women say their sex drive increases during ovulation, which is about two weeks before your period, others report feeling more turned on during their period.

 

4. Natural Lubrication

You can put away the KY during your period. Blood acts as a natural lubricant.

 

5. It Might Relieve Headache

About half of women with migraine headaches get them during their periods. Although most women with menstrual migraines avoid sex during their attacks, many of those who do have sex say it partially or completely relieves their headaches.

 

THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS 

The biggest downside to having sex during your period is the mess. Blood can get on you, your partner, and the sheets, especially if you have a heavy flow. Aside from dirtying the bed, bleeding may make you feel self-conscious. Anxiety over making a mess can take some or all of the fun out of sex.

Another worry about having sex during your period is the risk of spreading a sexually transmitted infection (STI) like HIV or hepatitis. These viruses live in blood, and they can spread through contact with infected menstrual blood. Using condoms every time you have sex can reduce your risk of spreading or catching an STI.

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If you plan to have sex during your period and you’re wearing a tampon, you need to remove it beforehand. A forgotten tampon can get pushed so far up into your vagina during sex that you’ll need to see a doctor to have it removed.

 

Can You Get Pregnant?

If you aren’t actively trying to conceive, using protection is a good idea, no matter what part of your menstrual cycle you’re in. Your odds of conceiving are lower during your period, but it’s still possible to become pregnant at this time.

You’re most likely to get pregnant during ovulation, which happens about 14 days before your period starts. Yet every woman’s cycle length is different, and your cycle length can change monthly. If you have a short menstrual cycle, your risk of getting pregnant during your period is higher.

Also consider that sperm can stay alive in your body for up to seven days. So, if you have a 22-day cycle and you ovulate soon after getting your period, there’s a chance you’ll be releasing an egg while sperm are still in your reproductive tract. Don’t be surprised by this. It’s just ur bodies biology.

 

Do You Need To Use Protection?

Using protection will also guard you against STIs. Not only can you catch an STI during your period, but you can also more easily transmit one to your partner because viruses like HIV live in menstrual blood.

Have your partner wear a latex condom every time you have sex to reduce your odds of getting pregnant and catching an STI. If you or your partner are allergic to latex, there are other forms of protection you can use. You can ask your pharmacist or doctor for recommendations.

 

 

How To Sex During Period

Sex during your period can deliver amazing sensations (even more amazing than the normal ones, believe it or not). If you can get past the cultural taboos, it opens up a week that’s otherwise limited to tubs of ice cream and stomach cramping. If you and your partner aren’t intimidated by the “icky” factor that hangs up a lot of people, follow these tips to have sex during your period, and enjoy the pleasure while minimizing the mess.

 

So Here are a few tips to make period sex a more comfortable and less messy experience:  It’s lengthy but educative.

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1. Get Some Towels

You don’t want your menstrual fluid (combined with everything else) to soak into your sheets and mattress, so while you’re having sex, place some towels beneath you and some tissues to your side. The towels will be on constant duty; the tissues will be used to wipe yourself off just before sitting up (when all is said and done).

 

• If odor is a problem, don’t let it ruin the moment — throw on some blankets. If you keep them above your midsections, they’ll help block the wafting scents.

 

2. Stick To The Missionary Position

Lie on your back to lessen the flow of blood while you’re having intercourse.

• Also, be careful about deep penetration because your cervix may be lower and more sensitive during your period. If anything starts to hurt, just tell your partner and proceed with care.

 

3. Have Sex In The Shower

Not only is this less messy from the get-go, it’s a change of pace, too. When you’re under the flow of the water, that other flow becomes a lot less noticeable.  If you can fit two in comfortably, give it a shot (if you haven’t already!).

 

4. Don’t Get Too Handsy

Unless your partner’s into uterine lining, they probably shouldn’t start feeling around down there. However, if you’re the type that needs loads of foreplay, you’re in luck! You already have a natural lubricant, so your partner’s fingers (and whatever else) can have the night off.

• That doesn’t mean you should skip the foreplay entirely. No, no, no, no — that’s a travesty! Just use it as an excuse to experiment with new tricks and moves.

 

5. Stick To Your Lighter Days

This just makes sense. If you know that days 3-5 are lighter than days 1 and 2, just keep your panties on for those 48 hours. Let the anticipation build and avoid any awkward trips to the laundromat.

• If it doesn’t bother your partner and they’re totally down for day 1 sex, evaluate your concerns. Maybe it’s something you could get over — after all, it’s no less sanitary than what you’ve been doing. It’s just a bit redder!

 

6. Take A Shower After Sex

There will probably be at least a little something on your skin that needs to be washed off. If you didn’t do the deed in the shower, hop in after for at least a quick rinse. You’ll feel better, too.

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• If you’re using toys during this time, get those things sanitary immediately. Putting it off will only result in a, how do you say, less-than-glamorous experience. All in all, get everything hygienic as quickly as possible.

 

7 Use Contraception

When you’re on your period, you’re at a higher risk of STDs and pelvic infections. What’s more, you’re less likely to get pregnant, sure, but it’s not impossible. So if you thought this was your ticket to ride, sorry — you still gotta stay safe. Here are some of your options:

 

• Diaphragms do double-duty as birth control devices and as menstrual cups to inhibit flow. Sometimes, diaphragms can be felt during sex, and removal can be messy. However, they are generally easy to use because your gynecologist will provide a diaphragm fit exactly to your cervical measurements.

 

• Contraceptive sponges are foam devices soaked in spermicide that are inserted into your vagina during sex. They can prevent pregnancy and have the side benefit of absorbing flow, although they don’t prevent STDs.

 

• Male condoms will help prevent pregnancy, block STDs, and keep blood from getting on your partner’s penis.

 

• Female condoms.

 

8. Wear a cup that will stop the menstrual flow from leaving your vagina.

Wear a menstrual cup for sexual play that doesn’t involve intercourse. Wear a softcup for penetrative intercourse.

 

• Avoid wearing regular menstrual cups during penetration. They are not designed to be used that way and will probably leak. However, if you just want to fool around, menstrual cups prevent leaking and allow for mess-free play including oral sex. Skip cups made of rubber because the rubbery smell and the taste of rubber in your vaginal fluid may be unpleasant for your partner. Use a silicone cup instead.

 

• Instead softcups are specifically designed to be used during intercourse. They are shaped like a diaphragm, are very flexible, and available at most drugstores. Keep in mind that while you can have intercourse with a soft cup, it doesn’t work as a contraceptive.

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