F

Medical Benefits Of CINNAMON

 

People have used cinnamon since 2000 BC in Ancient Egypt, where they regarded it highly. In medieval times, doctors used it to treat conditions such as coughing, arthritis, and sore throats.

As a spice, cinnamon is available in powder form or whole, as pieces of bark. People can also use cinnamon essential oil and supplements.

There are two main types of cinnamon:

cassia and Ceylon.

The two have different nutritional profiles.

Some studies have suggested that the compounds in cinnamon have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties, and that they might offer protection from cancer and cardiovascular disease, among other conditions. However, more evidence is needed to confirm cinnamon’s benefits.

This article will look at the alleged health benefits of different types of cinnamon and how to include them in the diet.

 

Once upon a time, cinnamon was more valuable than gold. And while these days, most of us would rather get our hands on 24 karats instead of 24 ounces, it turns out that this aromatic tree bark could be more valuable than gold, especially when it comes to health benefits.

Research on cinnamon is still ongoing, and while preliminary research is promising, more well-designed human trials still need to be completed. There are, however, a few health benefits that seem particularly promising (and it certainly doesn’t hurt to season up your food with this spice). From diabetes to pain management, an extra dash of cinnamon may be part of a plan to fight these common problems.

Read Also:  The Father Of Igbo People (Eri)

To help us sort myth from fact, we’ve enlisted the help of several health experts to give us their two cents on one of our favorite spices. We’ve vetted each claim, scouring the latest research to bring you the most complete guide to cinnamon’s health benefits.

 

Cinnamon As Medicine Through History.

Cinnamon has been used as a medicine in traditional Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine for centuries. Known for its benefits linked to digestion and gastrointestinal complaints, cinnamon has long been used as a home remedy for heartburn, indigestion, and nausea.

 

What You Need to Know

 

Scientific research is complex and constantly changing. To prove the benefits of any supplement, medicine, or food, researchers undertake a process that can go on for years, testing first in lab conditions followed by in animals. Only once human trials have confirmed alleged benefits can they truly be considered to be proven.

Read Also:  Ways you're bringing bed bugs into your house.

This is problematic given the “clickbait” trends of modern media today. Research that is far from conclusive will often be touted as fact.

 

At Organic Authority, we distill ongoing research, exploring both the clinically proven benefits and the promising, if not yet conclusive, studies. We update our guides periodically in order to ensure that you always have access to the latest research out there.

 

(1) Cinnamon may help treat Type 2 diabetes.

Perhaps the most promising research pointing to the health benefits of cinnamon is linked to type 2 diabetes. While there is certainly no cure for this metabolic disease, cinnamon can be an important tool in managing its symptoms.

 

(2) Cinnamon may help manage metabolic disease.

 

It’s perhaps no surprise that if cinnamon has possible beneficial effects on type 2 diabetes, it would also be helpful in the management of metabolic disease. One 2016 literature review found that cinnamon could be effective in reducing complications, morbidity, and mortality in metabolic syndrome, including reducing blood pressure, plasma glucose, obesity, and dyslipidemia. But while these possible results of consuming cinnamon are certainly promising, more well-designed subject trials are necessary before true conclusions can be drawn.

Read Also:  How Sex Can Boost Positive Mental Health

Cinnamon can also be used as an appetite suppressant to those with a sugar addiction, thanks to its naturally sweet taste.

 

(3) Cinnamon could lower your bad cholesterol (or LDL).

Even if you do not suffer from diabetes or metabolic syndrome, you may want to include cinnamon in your diet for many of the same reasons as those who do.

 

(4) Cinnamon has antimicrobial properties.

 

Cinnamon has been proven to fight fungal, bacterial, and viral elements in foods: It’s no surprise that in the Middle Ages, when food spoilage was far more frequent due to lack of refrigeration, many recipes, both sweet and savory, were flavored with the spice.

 

But these properties of cinnamon do not extend merely to the foods cinnamon seasons. Consumers of cinnamon can benefit from these properties as well, according to our experts, who say cinnamon can be used as part of a treatment for anything from lung problems to the common cold.

Leave a Reply